The Office for National Statistics has released the November 2016 UK Labour Market statistical bulletin, which covers the period July to September 2016. The bulletin includes estimates of employment, unemployment, economic inactivity and other employment-related statistics for the UK.

Key findings:

Between April to June 2016 and July to September 2016, the number of people in work increased and the number of unemployed people decreased. The number of people not working and not seeking or available to work (economically inactive) increased.

The employment rate (the proportion of people aged from 16 to 64 who were in work) was 74.5%, the joint highest since comparable records began in 1971.

There were 31.80 million people in work, 49,000 more than for April to June 2016 and 461,000 more than for a year earlier.

There were 23.24 million people working full-time, 350,000 more than for a year earlier. There were 8.56 million people working part-time, 110,000 more than for a year earlier.

The unemployment rate was 4.8%, down from 5.3% for a year earlier and the lowest since July to September 2005. The unemployment rate is the proportion of the labour force (those in work plus those unemployed) that were unemployed.

There were 1.60 million unemployed people (people not in work but seeking and available to work), 37,000 fewer than for April to June 2016 and 146,000 fewer than for a year earlier.

There were 876,000 unemployed men, 15,000 fewer than for April to June 2016 and 82,000 fewer than for a year earlier.

There were 728,000 unemployed women, 22,000 fewer than for April to June 2016 and 64,000 fewer than for a year earlier.

There were 8.89 million people aged from 16 to 64 who were economically inactive (not working and not seeking or available to work), 49,000 more than for April to June 2016 but 103,000 fewer than for a year earlier.

The inactivity rate (the proportion of people aged from 16 to 64 who were economically inactive) was 21.7%, down from 22.0% for a year earlier.

Average weekly earnings for employees in Great Britain in nominal terms (that is, not adjusted for price inflation) increased by 2.3% including bonuses and by 2.4% excluding bonuses compared with a year earlier.

Comment:

ONS Statistician, David Freeman, commented: “Unemployment is at its lowest for more than ten years, and the employment rate remains at a record high. Nonetheless, there are signs that the labour market might be cooling, with employment growth slowing. The headline Labour Force Survey and earnings data are for July to September, the first time we have three full months’ data after the result of the EU referendum became known.”

More information

For more information and the full data, please visit the ONS website here.